Crate Training Schedule

A systematic crate training schedule is not needed for your puppy, but rather a more casual timetable that will vary in its amount, day in and day out.

Crate training is actually suppose to revolve and you and your lifestyle, not around the dog.

The purpose of using an enclosure is not only for making housebreaking easier, but for your puppy to have a safe place to be, when you are not able to watch her.

Even if you are home, but are involved in something that keeps you from fully paying attention to the dog, then put her in her cage.

When she is learning to accept the crate, she needs to spend more time in it, not less.

Once she no longer cries while she is in there, then she can be allowed out of it for longer periods.

The amount of time she spends in or out of it, depends upon her housebreaking, and chewing progress, as well as the amount of time you have to watch her, rather than a set schedule.

Though her and your schedule, needs to be flexible, make sure she takes all naps inside of her enclosure.  If she is getting tired, put her in her cage to sleep.

By having her take daytime naps in there, the nighttime will go smoother for everyone.

Young puppies are capable of holding themselves longer than they are given credit for, especially at night.

It is not necessary to set an alarm to get up, to let your puppy out to potty, during the night. 

They can hold it for 6 to 7 hours at a very young age, even as young as 8 weeks. 

If your sleeping schedule is from 10pm to 6am, give the puppy her dinner around 6:00pm and her last drink of water around 9:00pm. 

Take her potty right before going to bed, and as soon as you get up in the morning, let her out of her cage to use the bathroom and play.



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